Social Media Charts

Thanks mjtwit for tweeting it and to http://fuelingnewbusiness.com/2010/04/27/social-media-infographics-new-business/ for blogging about it.

Marketing Must Control Its Technological Destiny

Microsoft likes to stick to a few specific titles like Program Manager, Product Manager, and so on. Technologist isn’t one of the main ones – I’m not even sure if HR “allows” it anymore. However, in 1996 my title was Technologist. I was supposed to educate our small team at HQ on all Internet-related topics happening in the industry and within Microsoft so we could use them, help the sales field understand them, and potentially help position our products during that time of change. That change being the upcoming thing called the Internet.

Fast forward to 2010 and I see Scott Brinker talking about a Chief Marketing Technologist and specifically how marketing must control its technological destiny. The reason for this is the ever-growing set of technologies available to a marketer. Just a few of the Microsoft ones that I keep on top of my mind at Microsoft are:

  • Data-Driven Silverlight Apps
  • IE8 Developer info
  • .NET Rich Internet Applications (RIA)
  • Bing API
  • MSFT Web Platform Installer
  • Slverlight SDK for Bing
  • Windows 7 Desktop Gadgets
  • Windows 7 is Location Aware
  • Windows Live Developer info
  • Wndows Azure

    Perhaps it is time to change my title to “Marketing Technologist”, or perhaps “Consultant to the Fortune 100 Marketing Technologists”

  • Social media is not about a campaign

    Loic Le Meur presented at AdTech last week and his presentation is certainly worth watching. I met with him later in the day and he repeated a few points from his speech, including the idea that social media is not about a campaign, but also his guidance to everyone involved in social media to "be as you are". In other words, be yourself and don’t try to talk like a press release or appear different online than you are in person.

    This is why you will sometimes see photos of me skiing, snowboarding, my wife, and with my dog… I’m just being me.

    For your next campaign, you should certainly think about social media. However, you should think about how your current social media efforts will spread the word of your current campaign as opposed to making your campaign social. 

    Great source of Social Media info

    http://www.slideshare.net/socialmediachannel

    This is the Social Media Channel on Slideshare.net that I just learned about on a webinar that Slideshare is currently running. I know this is a resource I’ll refer to often when needing ideas, data points, or contacts involved in social media.

    Townhall: “Out of the box” Community Site

    This is the type of thing that I am really trying to bring to our advertisers: New solutions that brings customers closer to the advertiser. Today Microsoft released TownHall. To get right to it, some examples of where TownHall can be used to engage communities include:

    • Customers of a brand
    • Attendees of an event
    • Customers looking for support
    • Fans of a sports team, TV show, or film
    • Fans in advertiser sponsored Q&As with celebrities
    • Voters in a political or issue campaign
    • Constituents looking to interact with government agencies
    • Disaster victims looking to connect with resources
    • Virtual teams that include internal and external resources (OEMs, partners, etc.)

    Check out the: blog, press release, benefits & features whitepaper, more info, and the code to get started.

    Establishing my brand

    I am working to establish my name on the Internet, which is an important step when working in social media since it begins with real people making connections with other real people, then listening and engaging. From that you can start discussing products and brands.

    I have www.BrianGroth.com, twitter.com/BrianGroth, e-mail at BrianGroth@hotmail.com, this blog, briangroth.wordpress.com, and I’ve reserved my name in a variety of other services too. 

    I’m still working on my “voice” and what people should think of when they think of Brian Groth. But roughly, here’s what I’m going for:

    Technology & Marketing: Consider me a technologist. Or maybe a marketing guy. Either way, I love being the bridge between the business guys and the technical guys: I’m good at understanding both and translating between them to create new and innovative ideas and solutions that satisfy my customer and ultimately makes them more successful.

    The Environment: I do what I can to help our overpopulated planet, such as driving very little and buying sustainable fish. That’s just two examples, but my environmental mantra that drives me is: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rethink, Replant

    Me Personally: I like to take adventures as often as possible and learn something new every day. This includes: Experiencing the world, snow skiing, snow boarding, snow shoeing, sea kayaking, mt. biking, hiking, playing with dogs, discovering new music, creating software solutions, and playing with the latest technology

    Social Media 201 recap

    The Social Media 201 event was chock full of interesting tidbits and suggestions. Heidi Miller summarizes the event, including the following tidbits:

  • Fish where the fish are.–Eric Weaver. Find where your audience is and engage them in that space.
  • The brands with the best stories win.
  • KnowEm is a nifty tool that will grab your brand name across social media channels.–Darren Williger
  • I would disagree that "getting value" out of social media is the same as "monetization."
  • "It is personal. And it is business. And it touches people’s lives."–Mike Whitmore
  • Mine the neutral. Engage with posters of neutral brand mentions and ask for more opinions and information.
  • "Engagement" is the new "um".–Barbara Evans
  • Don’t ever wait to be invited. Call up and ask if you can come.–Barbara Evans
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